entrance control glossary of key terms

Entrance control glossary of key terms

If you’re looking to buy entrance control for the first time, or just want to refresh your memory of some of the key terms, our ‘entrance control 101’ glossary of key terms covers the basics.

TDSi fingerprint readerAccess control/access control system

Access control is the act of controlling access to an area. An access control system is the equipment (software and hardware) used to define the criteria for acceptance or denial of an individual. An access control system also performs identification of users and decides whether to grant access or not, based on the credentials the user presents. These credentials could be a face, fingerprints, PIN number, key card, smartphone etc.

 

ADA

ADA stands for the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA provides and enforces strict regulations to ensure that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else. This act was made law in July 1990.

 

ADA compliant gate/turnstile

An ADA compliant gate or turnstile has been manufactured in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires the lane to be at least 32 inches wide to accommodate those with physical disabilities.

 

Anti-pass back

This is when a turnstile and access control installation is capable of providing an alert to the access control system to signal that User A has entered or exited the access-controlled area. If User A then passes their access credentials (a proximity card, for example) to a second user (User B), the access control system will recognise that this second entry is unauthorised and will prevent access or egress to User B.

 

400 Plus TurnstileBarrier arm turnstiles

Designed with the latest infrared technology to optimise and monitor the throughput of individuals entering and exiting a building, barrier arm turnstiles utilise arms to provide a physical deterrent, which is both visually off-putting to potential intruders as well as actually functioning to stop any unauthorised passage.

 

 

Bi-directional

A turnstile or gate that can be accessed from both entry and exit directions.

 

BIM (Building Information Modelling)

This is a broad term which describes the process of creating and managing digital information about a built asset, such as a building. This 3D model-based process gives architecture, engineering and construction professionals the insight and tools to more efficiently plan, design, construct, and manage buildings and infrastructure.

 

Biometric controls

Fingerprint scanning

The use of biological features – which could include fingerprints, voice, retina, face – as credentials to identify authorised users.

 

Breakaway force

The level of force required by a turnstile user to collapse the turnstile barrier or barriers to allow emergency escape.

 

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)

An access control method which makes use of users’ own devices, such as Near-Field Communication (NFC) enabled smartphones, wearable tech or other mobile devices. A BYOD approach allows employees to treat their own personal devices as their ID.

 

Cabinet

Also referred to as a pedestal, a cabinet is the main body of the turnstile which houses the mechanism, arms and all other internal hardware. Cabinets can be customised with bespoke finishes, including different metals, paint finishes and much more.

 

Capacity

This relates to how quickly authorised users can gain access.

 

card being scanned on Fast Lane turnstilesCard-reader

A card reader, also known as a proximity card reader, is an electronic sensor that reads a magnetic strip, bar code or chip on a specific card. Card readers can be integrated into turnstiles. If presented with a card with the correct credentials, a card reader will send a signal to the access control system instructing the turnstile or gate to unlock and open.

 

Collusion

Collusion is when an individual purposefully acts to let someone, who otherwise wouldn’t gain access, in through a secured point. With collusion, the one with the keycard is at fault as the intention is to bypass the security measures in place in order for someone to gain access without the required authorisation.

 

CredentialsFacial recognition AI

Users must have authorised credentials in order to pass through a turnstile or access-controlled doorway. Credentials could include ID cards, biometrics, smartphones etc. Access control systems verify a user’s credentials before making the decision to permit or deny entry.

 

DDA compliance

DDA stands for the Disability Discrimination Act, 1995. If a product is DDA compliant it indicates that it is capable of allowing use by a disabled person. Previously this related to The Disability Discrimination Act, 1995. The applicable Act (except in Northern Ireland) is now The Equality Act 2010.

 

Fastlane Door Detective Plus door entry system entrance control securityDoor Detective

An IDL product, Door Detective reinforces access control systems by monitoring the throughput of open, access-controlled doorways, corridors and passageways. The Door Detective units are installed either side of a door frame and ensure that the ‘one person, one door access’ rule is met, overcoming the age-old problem of controlling how many people pass through an access-controlled doorway, and in which direction.

Egress

The exit of a user from a building through a turnstile.

 

Entrance control

If access control (see above) verifies authorised personnel using their credentials – their face, fingerprints, PIN number, key card etc – and decides whether or not they are permitted access to an area, entrance control is the system which enforces that decision, by either opening a barrier to allow users to cross a threshold, or remaining closed to bar entry and potentially raising an alarm.

 

Entrance gates

Entrance gates are typically provided for a wide access point within an entrance control system, for general access requiring a wider than DDA compliant lane.

Fastlane Intelligate entrance control security turnstiles in situ at Abu Dhabi Airport

Fail safe

If a turnstile has a failsafe mode, it will release all locking or the barriers will retract, to allow egress during an emergency situation, such as in the event of a fire or a power outage.

 

Fail secure

During an emergency situation or power outage, if a turnstile has a fail secure mode the turnstile will ensure that there isn’t a user within the unit before locking to maintain security in all situations.

 

FastlaneFastlane Turnstiles IDL logo

Fastlane is a range of entrance control products – which includes sleek speedgates, barrier arms, optical turnstiles and discreet door security – designed and manufactured by Integrated Design Limited at the company’s manufacturing facility in Feltham, West London.

 

Flow

Also known as throughput, this refers to the number of individuals that travel through a turnstile during a given duration of time. Fastlane technology is capable of processing up to 60 authorised people per minute.

 

Fastlane Glassgate 250 entrance control security turnstileGlassgate turnstiles

Glassgate turnstiles are products within the Fastlane Speedgates range, utilising dual glass barrier panels, operating in a bi-directional normally closed mode.

 

Ingress

The entry of a user into a building through a turnstile.

 

Integrated Design Limited (IDL)IDL logo

Integrated Design Limited designs and manufactures the Fastlane and Door Detective range of products at a manufacturing facility in Feltham, West London.

 

Lane

A lane is the passageway through a turnstile. Lane widths vary according to end-user requirements.

 

Manned lobby

A manned lobby is an area with a security guard, typically an entranceway or lobby.

 

Manual operation

If a turnstile is capable of manual operation, a security guard or receptionist will be able to manually and, sometimes remotely, open or close the turnstile using a control panel.

 

Motorised gate

A motorised gate is a gate that opens and closes by the power of an internal motor.

 

NFC (Near-Field Communication)

NFC stands for near-field communication, which is a set of communication protocols that enable two electronic devices – one of which is usually a portable device such as a smartphone – to establish communication by bringing them within 4cm of each other.

 

Fastlane Glassgate 150 entrance control security speedgate turnstile with beamsOptical beams

Optical beams are infrared beams used in optical turnstiles. These beams detect whether a person or object has passed through a turnstile’s lane and in which direction.

 

 

Optical turnstiles or barrier-free turnstiles

Optical turnstiles monitor the passage of every individual entering and leaving a facility without using a physical barrier.

Flastlane Clearstyle 200 entrance control security optical turnstiles in situ

 

Pedestal

Also referred to as a cabinet, a pedestal is the main body of the turnstile which houses the mechanism, arms, and all other internal hardware. Cabinets can be customised with bespoke finishes, including different metals, paint finishes, and much more.

 

Piggybacking

Piggybacking, also known as tailgating, is the act of following someone through an open door or other restricted access point without authorisation. Even if there is no intent to cause disruption, the follower is the one at fault and the person being followed may not even be aware of the act.

 

Proximity card reader

A contactless smartcard which can be read without inserting it into a reader device.

 

Speedgate

A speedgate is a type of entrance control turnstile. It uses the very latest in high tech entrance control systems for pedestrian throughput, ensuring only one person gains access for each authorised card presented. The speedgate category of turnstiles utilises glass barriers as a physical deterrent, the barriers either retract into the turnstile pedestal or are of the very popular swing barrier type of barrier.

 

Tailgatingblurred image of tailgating

Tailgating, also known as piggybacking, is the act of following someone through an open door or other restricted access point without authorisation. Even if there is no intent to cause disruption, the follower is the one at fault and the person being followed may not even be aware of the act.

 

Throughput

Throughput, also known as flow, refers to the number of individuals that travel through a turnstile during a given duration of time. Fastlane technology is capable of processing up to 60 authorised people per minute.

 

Fastlane Tripod entrance control security turnstileTripod turnstile

A tripod turnstile is a waist-height turnstile with three arms that can spin in one or two directions.

Turnstile

A turnstile is an entrance control gate that makes it possible to monitor and control entry and exit into and out of a restricted area.

 

 

If there are any terms not covered in this glossary which you’d like clarifying, please contact our team on +44 (0)20 8890 5550 or email info@fastlane-turnstiles.com.

 

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